When worlds collide: introducing Art to Go by the Gretchen Show

Okay, not so much colliding as coming together. My professional worlds – as a set decorator and art director in film production and as an artist/illustrator – have occasionally swerved into each other’s paths. I’ve created original art many times for sets I’ve been working on and as a film professional I know the importance and value of cleared art. For many years I’ve thought, “Why not make my art available for other set decorators, art directors, stylists, etc…?” As I maintain the ownership and copyright for almost all of my work, I can easily give clearance for specific usage. It’s taken me long enough to get ’round to it, but now it’s official: Art to Go by the Gretchen Show. I’ll be adding to my inventory on a continuing basis. But for now, let’s get started! Art prints available for production rental can be seen here and original art, framed and/or on canvas or other substrate, available for production rental can be viewed here.  Feel free to pass it on! Man, I like that blackbird…

The well-read cat

Another mixed media work. I suffered some minor consternation about desecrating a book to use for the background, but I got over it. ; -) It was an old paperback that had been sitting on a dusty shelf in a thrift store for what I imagined was a very long time and destined never to be read again. So I used the pages and the words in a work of art and that seems like a fine and fitting finale. And the cat is so enjoying the book.

Who’s in the catbird seat?

I’ve been revisiting mixed media and loving it. For some reason cats and birds keep popping up. This is a wood substrate that I “painted on” colored tissue paper with an acrylic medium with a little paint mixed in. I painted on top of that with acrylic and a touch of watercolor, thinned down to get a transparent quality, which is one of the things I like so much about watercolor. Line is ever-present in my work, as it is here – I particularly like the negative space line created around the nose and eyes by the underlying tissue paper surface.